WHAT I LEARNED SHOOTING A DISPOSABLE CAMERA

A couple of months ago I saw an advertisement for a Kodak Funsaver disposable camera. It was priced at 11 euros and because it seemed cheap I ordered one. Except for Polaroid I never photograph with anything else than digital cameras, so I was excited to see how I would like this.

funsaver

Of course these disposables don’t have high quality glass lenses, so I didn’t expect too much of it. The camera contains a 35mm iso 800 film and has a built in flash that can be turned on and off when wanted. The camera is very colorful and attracts some attention because of this, but it feels very nice to hold and shoot with. Since the camera is so small it’s easy to put your finger over the lens. When looking through the viewfinder you will not notice this since you’re not looking directly through the lens. This also makes it almost impossible to frame precisely. I had the camera in the pocket of my jacket for about 3 months. In hindsight that is ridiculously long considering it only contains about 39 photos…

While shooting it I did learn a few things.

1. First of all I found myself shooting more impulsive. It’s a bit contradictory because I expected to be less impulsive than with a digital camera. But I did take more snapshots than otherwise.

2. I now know that the first couple of photos are not exposed. I didn’t when I started photographing. I have a couple of photos I was excited about that didn’t get developed.

3. I also started to look differently at things. I had a certain idea of how the images might look on film and because of that I photographed certain scenes that I wouldn’t photograph with my digital cameras. It made me reconsider what would be a good photo. It’s almost like how I look at things when I take polaroid images.

4. But obviously the idea of how I thought things looked was often different from what it actually looked like. So let’s have a look at the images and see what did and did not work. (Please note that I edit all of the pictures since the scans are very neutral, as in having no shadows or contrast.)

5. After finishing the roll I went to a local shop to have it developed and scanned. I remember from back in the days when my parents took pictures for me at airshows or events it cost quite a bit of money to have them developed and printed. To my surprise it only cost me 7 euros for the development and scans. So shooting the 39 picture roll cost me about 18 euros in total. That’s a little less than the price of 8 polaroid pictures. So I can conclude it’s much cheaper than what I had expected.

6. When asked if I wanted low or high res pictures I chose the low res. I made the choice based on the fact that I don’t want to make prints. I did forget that if I wanted to edit the pictures a high res file would have been a better option. So when asked, choose the high res…

7. Editing the photos was easier then expected. I could quite easily get a bit of details back from the highlights. Getting details from the shadows was almost impossible. But I could still do my basic editing without all too much trouble. I will post a video on Youtube in two weeks where I’ll show the editing process so you can see the limits for yourself.

All in all it was a lot of fun shooting this disposable camera. It was all very relaxed. Snapping photos and then waiting weeks before seeing the results. I might be doing this more in the future because it did cost less than expected and I enjoyed some of the results. Since I now know what works and what doesn’t I could probably take better photos than before and I would definitely use it in another way than I did now.

Make sure to check out this video from my previous blogpost to see how I made some of these photos.

 

Thoughts, comments, questions? Let me know in the comment section below.

Liked this post? Make sure to hit the subscribe button below!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s